Prince Charles, The Barclay Brothers and Madeleine McCann

charlesarkThe first ever mainstream news story about Madeleine being abducted was the article in the Daily Telegraph on May 4, 2007 and timed at one minute past midnight. In other words, less than 2 hours after Kate and Gerry had raised the alarm, a top British newspaper was already sowing the seeds of the abduction story.

It is inconceivable that such a story could have been published so soon after the first call to Portuguese police yet it is there for all to see, set in the proverbial stone of the Internet archives.

In fact, the Telegraph have never removed the story (link).

Here is the original 4-paragraph story:

Three Year-old Feared Abducted in Portugal

By staff and agencies, Last Updated: 12:01am BST 04/05/2007

A three-year-old British girl has gone missing while on a family holiday in Portugal, the Foreign Office said today.

Portuguese police are investigating the disappearance from a holiday complex in Praia da Luz in the western Algarve.

A Foreign Office spokesman said that he understood the girl’s parents had gone to have dinner once their children were asleep last night, but returned to check on them only to find the girl had gone missing.

“They reported it straight away,” he said, adding that consular assistance was being offered.

The Daily Telegraph is a newspaper owned by the reclusive “Barclay Brothers” – David and Frederick Barclay. The billionaire Barclays also own The Ritz Hotel in London and have been the owners since the mid-1990s.

In 2002, The Ritz released the following press release:

In January 2002 The Ritz London received a Royal Warrant from His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, for Banqueting and Catering Services.

Royal Warrants are a mark of recognition to those who have regularly supplied goods or services to certain members of the Royal family for at least five years. The earliest known Royal Warrant dates back to 1155 and the distinction has always been regarded as a mark of excellence and quality.

Quite clearly then the Barclay Brothers and Prince Charles have a very strong connection by way of their little “business” deal at The Ritz.

There are numerous other connections. For example, between 1968 and 1974, the Barclay Brothers received large loans from Crown Agents – then a UK public statutory corporation. This dodgy outfit was eventually privatised when sold off in 1997. The actual owner of Crown Agents is the Crown Agents Foundation – its sole shareholder. Members of the Crown Agents Foundation include – wait for it – the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum!

The murky Crown Agents is worth an in-depth investigation and to do that here is beyond the scope of this article. It is however worth mentioning that they were involved in the rebuilding of Iraq before  the 2003 war even began. From the BBC on March 11, 2003 (here):

Construction firms such as the US’s Fluor and Bechtel, Britain’s Costain and Balfour Beatty, and France’s Spie are usually the first in; service providers such as British Crown Agents and Swiss SGS are rarely far behind.

As has been stated before in this website, the number of connections between Prince Charles and Madeleine McCann are startling. This one, via the Daily Telegraph owners and their premature story is remarkable.

4 Responses to “Prince Charles, The Barclay Brothers and Madeleine McCann”

  1. 1
    G1 Says:

    A most relevant article, thank you.

    It is just so utterly strange. When a little girl could still be found walking around restaurants or bars near the centre of town. When little Madeleine could easily have been crying still or not crying anymore, hand in hand with a kind, elderly old lady or couple because they found her crying and took her to look for her parents, this story is already published in The Daily Telegraph.

    What does it mean? Just what can it mean? Doesn’t a newspaper such as The Telegraph know about time lapse for missing persons to be able to be considered as suspicious or in terms of foul play? One assumes, of course it does. So, why the national news article two hours after a girl has gone missing when the doors were left open for her to wander out? There is a meaning of it, somewhere, somehow, it’s just something unknowable on the face of it. A mistake? What kind of a mistake?

  2. 2
    AndyB Says:

    The same kind of mistake that enabled the BBC to report the collapse of WTC7 twenty minutes before it actually “collapsed”?

  3. 3
    Tom Cahill Says:

    This is a great website and what an excellent upload. I wasn’t about when the MMcC thing broke but it’s absolutely amazing that they think they’re going to get away with this. I don’t think it’s going to last. I don’t know what lies behind this distraction of a story of a missing child but I think it’s all going to get a lot darker.

  4. 4
    tommo Says:

    …and the same kind of ‘mistake’ that allowed Jimmy Savile to operate with impunity for his whole career there.

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